Nat’l Rice Ball Day and the Rice King

Posted on Apr 19, 2017 in #coloradoasian, Film, Food, Japan | 0 comments

It’s National Rice Ball Day — that’s right!

From Foodimentary.com
* The rice balls preserve very well, and can even be used to preserve meats or other foods within its airtight seal.
* Rice balls date back at least as far as the 11th Century and is traditionally Japanese.
* Another word for the rice ball is “Onigiri”, a word commonly misused to refer to sushi. Onigiri means ‘to hold on to’.
* Popular onigiri fillings include tuna salad, salmon flakes, seafood salad, konbu (a type of sea vegatable), umeboshi (a sour bright-red pickled Japanese plum) and tempura.

Speaking of Nat’l Rice Ball Day, consider the Story of the Rice King TONIGHT:

Seeds: The Story of the Rice King and his Kin
Rescheduled film screening: Wed., April 19th, 6:30 PM | Film at 7:00 PM (92 min.)
Phipps Theater in the Denver Museum of Nature & Science | 2001 Colorado Blvd. | Denver 80205
Enter from the east entrance (facing Colorado Blvd)
Members of the JAAC and JARCC will be on hand to direct you.

FREE | RSVP to marynish@comcast.net or (303) 433-1638 with number of persons attending only.

In the San Joaquin Valley in Central California, there is the oldest family-owned and operated rice farm, called the “Koda Farms.” The founder of the Koda Farms is originally from Iwaki city, Fukushima, Japan, born in 1882. His name is Keisaburo Koda, who was widely known amongst Japanese Americans as the “Rice King”. His ‘throne’ has been carried on by his grandchildren, Ross and Robin. This documentary is about perseverance, persistence, and passion of the Koda Farms since the 1920s, through various hardships, including internment.